res·to·ra·tion

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From the English Oxford Living Dictionary

Origin

Late 15th century (denoting the action of restoring to a former state): partly from Old French, partly an alteration of obsolete restauration (from late Latin restauratio(n-), from the verb restaurare), suggested by restore.

 

restoration

NOUN

mass noun

  • The action of returning something to a former owner, place, or condition.

    ‘the restoration of Andrew’s sight’
    • 1.1 The process of restoring a building, work of art, etc. to its original condition.
      ‘the altar paintings seem in need of restoration’
    • 1.2 The reinstatement of a previous practice, right, or situation.
      ‘the restoration of capital punishment’
    • 1.3Dentistry count noun A structure provided to replace or repair dental tissue so as to restore its form and function, such as a filling, crown, or bridge.

1.4 count noun A model or drawing representing the supposed original form of an extinct animal, ruined building, etc.

‘published restorations are dodgy, based on single bones’
Strong’s Concordance
arukah: healing, restoration

Original Word: אֲרוּכָה
Part of Speech: Noun Feminine
Transliteration: arukah
Phonetic Spelling: (ar-oo-kaw’)
Short Definition: health

NAS Exhaustive Concordance

Word Origin
from arak
Definition
healing, restoration
NASB Translation
health (3), recovery (1), repair (2).

Restoration quotes from GoodReads.com

“The work of restoration cannot begin until a problem is fully faced.”
― Dan B. Allender

“Perhaps your purpose is to go through the halls of suffering, discover your magic, and resurface as a doctor of restoration. Restoration is discovered in the divine blueprint. Change your blueprint and you change results.”
― Deborah Bravandt

“Everything can be restored. If one won’t believe that, how does one endure all this?”
― Chris Cleave, Everyone Brave is Forgiven

“A storm-filled life replete with piercing and unearthly sounds ravages the soul of any thoughtful person. In contrast, the genteel wind of restoration moves silently, invisibly. Renewal is a spiritual process, the communal melody that sustains us. Inexpressible braids of tenderness whispering reciprocating chords of love for family, friends, humankind, and nature plaits interweaved layers of blissful atmosphere, which copious heart song brings spiritual rejuvenation. For when we love in a charitable and bountiful manner without reservation, liberated from petty jealously, and free of the toxic blot of discrimination, we become the ineluctable wind that vivifies the lives of other people. The mellifluous changes in heaven, earth, and our journey through the travails of time, while worshiping the trove of fathomless joys of life, constitute the seeds of universal poetry.”
― Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

 

“To be able to open the heart again after betrayal, injury, or loss is a precious act. It requires both courage and compassion. It requires a new movement to emerge from the depths of grief. Forgiveness is one of the most certain paths to restoration, and it is also one of the most difficult. However, it is an attempt to return to wholeness, once again, by letting go and freeing myself from the tight clutch and heavy burden of caution, anger, resentment, and the desire for revenge and punishment. In forgiving others, I free myself towards belonging and wholeness, be it with the person I am forgiving, or with myself.”
― Sharon Weil, ChangeAbility: How Artists, Activists, and Awakeners Navigate Change